• Aphasia is an acquired language disorder due to brain damage
  • People with aphasia may have difficulty with language in all forms:
    • understanding what others are saying
    • putting their thoughts into words
    • understanding what is read
    • writing (with pen and paper and on the computer)
  • Aphasia alone does not affect a person's intellect, memory, judgment, or problem-solving skills
  • Aphasia can range from mild (sometimes difficulty thinking of a word) to severe (little to no ability to speak)
  • All people with aphasia have some degree of difficulty recalling words
    • This is like having that "tip of the tongue" feeling
    • A person with aphasia may say one word but means to say something else
  • People with aphasia notice that some things are very easy to say, while others are very hard
    • The more the person has to think about what he/she is saying, the harder it will be.
    • "Automatic" phrases are generally easier to say because they don't require much thought or are over-learned
    • Some examples are phrases such as "good morning", "I don't know", "uh oh" and swear words
    • writing (with pen and paper and on the computer)
  • There are some words that are can be difficult for people with aphasia
    • These words are often very close in meaning, opposites, or can seem to have abstract meaning.
    • People with aphasia often mix them up or substitute one for another
    • Some examples include: Man/Woman, Left/Right, Yes/No